FHA looks to tighten up on reverse mortgages

You’ve probably seen the reverse-mortgage pitchmen at work on your TV screen – former Sen. Fred Thompson and actors Robert Wagner and Henry “Fonzie” Winkler prominent among them – urging seniors to pull cash out of their homes through a loan program guaranteed by the federal government. More

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FHA looks to tighten up on reverse mortgages

Posted 1/7/13

You’ve probably seen the reverse-mortgage pitchmen at work on your TV screen – former Sen. Fred Thompson and actors Robert Wagner and Henry “Fonzie” Winkler prominent among them – urging seniors to pull cash out of their homes through a loan program guaranteed by the federal government.

But it looks like the pitchmen will have fewer and smaller mortgages to sell in 2013. In a move aimed at controlling losses to its insurance funds, the Federal Housing Administration is clamping a moratorium on the most popular form of reverse mortgage – the so-called “standard” version, which allows large lump-sum drawdowns of cash at fixed interest rates. The agency also plans to institute other changes that could make obtaining a reverse mortgage tougher for some applicants, such as financial qualification standards and escrow set-asides for taxes and property insurance.

Reverse mortgages are marketed to seniors 62 and older, can play important roles in retirement planning and enable owners to “age in place” – stay in their homes for as long as they want. Unlike other mortgages, reverse loans do not require periodic repayments of principal and interest; borrowers generally need not repay the amounts drawn down until they move out or otherwise sell the property. The FHA supports the dominant program in the field, known as the “Home Equity Conversion Mortgage”, which insures private lenders against loss and accounts for more than 90 percent of all new and outstanding reverse loans in this country.

FHA’s program grew rapidly in volume from 2001 onward, producing 108,000 new loans in 2007, 112,000 in 2008 and 115,000 in the peak year of 2009. Since then, however, volumes have been sagging. Major lenders such as Bank of America, MetLife, Wells Fargo and Citibank have stopped originating new HECM loans altogether.

But shrinking volume hasn’t been the only problem. The HECM program has been racking up outsized losses for FHA, in part attributable to foreclosures on homes whose market values have fallen below the insured amounts provided to the borrowers. In FHA’s annual independent audit report to Congress, losses on reverse mortgages contributed $2.8 billion to the agency’s capital reserve deficiency and increased the chances that FHA might have to seek a bailout from the Treasury next year.

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