Updated March 31 at 8:31pm

Maybe you only have yourself to blame

I overheard sales dialog on the airplane this morning. “The customer has never responded to one of my emails, and never calls me back. The only time he calls me is when he needs something.” Then back to devouring this week’s edition of US Weekly magazine. More

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Maybe you only have yourself to blame

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I overheard sales dialog on the airplane this morning. “The customer has never responded to one of my emails, and never calls me back. The only time he calls me is when he needs something.” Then back to devouring this week’s edition of US Weekly magazine.

Sound familiar?

Why do salespeople blame other people and/or other things for their own ineptitude? Why didn’t this salesperson say, “I gotta work on my voicemails and emails. They’re not getting any traction, and they’re costing me major money. I’m going on an all-out effort to improve my writing skills, my voicemail skills and my creativity to generate better response!”

I’ll tell you why: It’s easier to blame others for your shortcomings than it is to take responsibility for them. It’s easier to blame than admit you’re not that good. It’s easier to blame than it is to improve. It’s easier to blame than face your own reality.

And I’m certain this message applies to you.

You blame the customer when something goes wrong, something didn’t happen as planned, someone didn’t respond, or you lost a sale to a competitor – especially at a lower price. Wrong. Very wrong.

I have been helping salespeople sell more and sell better since 1976, and during the time no one has ever come to me and said, “Jeffrey, I didn’t make the sale, and it was all my fault!” Interesting statistic.

Rather than blame, I have some answers that will help you. Actually, I have some questions. Questions you MUST ask yourself BEFORE you blame. These questions will give you a brand-new perspective, and they automatically shift blame to responsibility. They will bring you a new sense of reality. And they will make you a better salesperson.

Ask yourself “WHY” to get to the truth.

• Why was my call not returned?

• Why did they cancel my appointment?

• Why did they delete my email?

• Why did they not respond to my email?

• Why did they say, “Not interested”?

• Why did they say, “We’re happy with our present supplier”?

• Why can’t I set an appointment?

• Why can’t I get through to the decision-maker?

• Why are they meeting with other vendors or suppliers?

• Why did they take the lowest bid?

• Why did they buy from the competition?

• Why did they tell me that my price is too high?

Why are you blaming others (especially customers) for your inability to attract, engage, connect and create value that leads to a sale?

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