Updated July 31 at 11:31am

More workers pay for own training

Individuals now outnumber corporations coming to the Executive Development Center at Bryant University for professional training, a likely result of many companies reducing in-house training dollars in tough economic times, says program Director Annette Cerilli.

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Focus: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

More workers pay for own training

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Individuals now outnumber corporations coming to the Executive Development Center at Bryant University for professional training, a likely result of many companies reducing in-house training dollars in tough economic times, says program Director Annette Cerilli.

The center has two service-delivery options for its business-development programs: one set tailored to meet the needs of specific corporations, usually paid for by those companies; and the other, open-enrollment courses for which anyone can sign up.

Programs custom-made for companies comprised “about 60 percent” of what the center did six years ago, according to Cerilli, director for 15 years. But that was before the recession. “It could be going the other way now,” she said, “because companies have pulled back the funds [for training and tuition reimbursement]. More individuals are stepping up and using their own funds. That’s a shift we haven’t seen before.”

Taryn L. Curran is an example of someone who went to the executive-development center on her own dime to learn about human resources management. Her work there began in November 2010 and she completed the national certification program in June.

As a result, she found a job as human resources manager at Fielding Manufacturing, a Cranston manufacturing company. It’s a position she said she loves.

“I’m just enjoying very much what I’m doing here,” she said. “I had been running restaurants and always wanted to break into HR, but I never had the educational background to support that.”

The Attleboro native has a bachelor’s degree in international hotel management from Johnson & Wales University in Providence and did apply for HR positions before Bryant, but could never land a job.

She learned about the HR job at Fielding Manufacturing from a colleague during her classes at the executive-development center and she is convinced the Bryant experience was instrumental in her capturing the position. “A lot of the course content has really helped me,” she said. Fielding, with 40 employees, specializes in miniature die casting and plastic injection molding.

Human resources is just one area covered at the center. Others include business administration, clinical-research management, finance and accounting, health care, information systems, nonprofit management and supply chain. Corporate programs generally are held during the day and open-enrollment classes, in the evenings.

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