Panic Over U.S. students’ rankings is misguided

Guest Column:
Norman Matloff
There was a lot of manufactured handwringing earlier this month about the middling performance of American 15-year-olds on a global measure of reading, mathematics and science skills. Yet if we look at the scores on the Program for International Student Assessment in the context of another international competition, we get a clearer picture. More

To continue reading this article, please do one of the following.



OP-ED / LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Panic Over U.S. students’ rankings is misguided

Guest Column:
Norman Matloff
Posted 12/16/13

There was a lot of manufactured handwringing earlier this month about the middling performance of American 15-year-olds on a global measure of reading, mathematics and science skills. Yet if we look at the scores on the Program for International Student Assessment in the context of another international competition, we get a clearer picture.

Every year the Association for Computing Machinery holds its International Collegiate Programming Contest. In the old days, U.S. teams consistently dominated the event. Recently, however, the top teams have tended to be from Asia and the former Soviet-bloc nations. Jiaotong University, or Jiaoda, in Shanghai, has been especially strong, winning gold medals on several occasions.

In other words, it would appear that not only are Shanghai’s 15-year-olds sharper than their American peers, but Shanghai’s geeks also are smarter than our geeks. So, the sky is falling, right? Appearances are deceiving, it turns out.

The Jiaoda contestants are essentially student-athletes, spending all their time training for the event, according to a Jiaoda public information officer, Xu Jun. And the skills needed for the competition are indeed trainable. Although the problems posed each year are unique, their solutions usually fall into a handful of patterns.

This gives a huge benefit to those who can devote themselves to full-time, year-round practice. By contrast, most top U.S. computer-science students have better things to do with their time, including founding startups that might become billion-dollar companies.

This isn’t the direction the U.S. should take. Yes, we need to bring up the proficiency of our weakest students – a social challenge that goes far deeper than the harrumphing about “fixing our schools” would indicate. Yet we shouldn’t bring down the level of the stronger students just to win international contests.


Norman Matloff is a professor of computer science at the University of California at Davis. Distributed by Bloomberg View.

Calendar
PBN Hosted
Events

Please join PBN on September 10th for the 3rd Annual Fastest Growing & Innovative Companies program at Rosecliff Mansion in Newport. Seating is limited so be sure to register early.
Advertisement
Purchase Data
Book of Lists
Lists
Book of Lists cover
PBN's annual Book of Lists has been an essential resource for the local business community for almost 30 years. The Book of Lists features a wealth of company rankings from a variety of fields and industries, including banking, health care, real estate, law, hospitality, education, not-for-profits, technology and many more.
Data icons
Data can be purchased as single lists, in either Excel or PDF format; the entire database of the published book, in Excel format; or a printed copy of the Book of Lists.
  • Purchase an e-File of a single list
  •  
  • Purchase an e-File of the entire Book of Lists database
  •  
  • Purchase a printed copy of the Book of Lists
  •  
    National
    Local
    Latest News
    Advertisement