Updated August 29 at 7:42am

R.I. sees 3rd-highest construction job contraction in June

Year over year in June, construction employment in Rhode Island fell 5 percent, or 800 jobs, according to the Associated General Contractors of America.

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R.I. sees 3rd-highest construction job contraction in June

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ARLINGTON, Va. – Year over year in June, construction employment in Rhode Island fell 5 percent, or 800 jobs, according to the Associated General Contractors of America.

The group announced Friday that Rhode Island ranks third among the other states and Washington, D.C., for highest percentage of jobs lost from June 2012 to June 2013.

The Ocean State trailed Kentucky, which experienced a 5.2 percent decrease, or loss of 3,500 jobs, and Indiana, which experienced a 5.1 percent decrease, losing 6,400 jobs.

Year over year in June, 36 states experienced growth in construction jobs and 14 states and the District of Columbia lost jobs. Wyoming led the pack, adding 10.4 percent, or 2,200, followed by Louisiana and Arizona, both at 9.7 percent. By the numbers, California added the most new construction jobs over the past 12 months, 32,200, followed by Texas with 31,400 jobs.

“On a year-over-year basis, construction employment has increased in more than two-thirds of the states, but nearly all states lag their pre-recession peaks for construction jobs,” Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist, said in prepared remarks

More recently, between May and June, the AGC noted that construction employment increased in 23 states and the District of Columbia and decreased in 24 states. In Rhode Island, the industry experienced a 2.7 percent increase in construction employment, a gain of 400 jobs.

Association officials noted that construction demand in the private sector remained “fragile” and construction in the public sector remains “relatively weak.”

“With current conditions, one misguided regulation and one missed investment opportunity could cost a lot of hard-working construction workers their jobs,” Stephen E. Sandherr, CEO, said in a statement.

construction, construction employment, AGCA, associated general contractors of America

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