Updated January 29 at 9:29pm
Aquaculture
7 results total, viewing 1 - 7
When charter-boat captain Steven Anderson takes a group of fishermen out from the Port of Galilee in Narragansett on his 31-foot boat Bare Bones, he takes a touch-screen tablet so he can record data about fluke, also called summer flounder. more
The Rhode Island Foundation awarded $125,000 in grants to fund work on shoreline protection and the shellfish industry by the Coastal Resources Center at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. more
The U.S. Small Business Administration said that federal economic injury disaster loans are available to small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small aquaculture businesses and most private nonprofit organizations of all sizes in Kent, Providence and Washington counties as a result of the drought that began on July 1. more
For nearly two decades the once-booming East Coast butterfish market has been dormant. But that could change. In the past two years NOAA Fisheries has begun raising the butterfish quota. Rhode Island fishermen and fish sellers, including Glenn Goodwin, co-owner of SeaFreeze Ltd., are now looking for ways to reclaim a lost market. Above, Goodwin stands alongside the take-out chute at SeaFreeze Shoreside in Narragansett. more
Calamari may have company. more
Overfishing, pollution and changing onshore habits have conspired to nearly wipe out Rhode Island’s wild oysters. But thanks to a joint project by environmentalists and some Rhode Island restaurants named Oysters Gone Wild, the shellfish has hope to reclaim at least some of its former prominence and along with it, return Narragansett Bay to a more pristine state. more
Wild oysters, with their craggy shells and the natural, complex reefs they grow on, are almost just a memory in Rhode Island – 99 percent of them are gone. more